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Holocaust Museum Houston

A haunting past, a hopeful life

OH
Transcripts,
Altman
File

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A haunting past, a hopeful life : Holocaust survivor finds peace by speaking for the dead

Altman, Stefi.

Houston, TX : Houston Chronicle, c2004.

7 p ; 11 cm.

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Stefi Altman, a Holocaust survivor, was born in 1926[?] in Lublin, Poland. In 1939, her brothers were arrested by the Nazis, later dying in Majdanek. A local teacher and priest helped Stefi create a false identity and sent her to an agricultural school, where she was arrested. Stefi was sent to the Jastkov labor camp, where she made pillows. She escaped for several months and wandered, eventually finding work with a Polish farmer. She was abused by a neighbor, eventually returning to Jastkov out of necessity. From Jastkov Stefi was moved with others to Treblinka, where she sorted victims’ belongings. She witnessed the deaths of prisoners, prisoners being shaved, and guards stripping gold and silver from teeth. She was moved to Majdanek, then to Dorohucza. In 1943, she was reunited with her younger sister Kaiyla, who was later killed there. Stefi escaped Dorohucza during a camp disturbance. Stefi hid in a tunnel under a sympathetic farmer’s barn. In 1944, she was liberated by the Red Army. The Soviets fed the farmer’s family plus Stefi, later driving them to the Red Cross office in Lublin. In 1944, Stefi learned that none of her family had survived. She married her husband Hershel in Poland in 1946. They arrived in Houston in 1949.

Of note: The U.S. Department of Justice identified Stefi as the sole survivor of Dorohucza camp and used her testimony to prosecute camp guard Andrew Kuras, who had moved to the U.S. after the war.

NOTE: No oral history tape available at Holocaust Museum Houston.

Available

Oral History CollectionOral History Collection

1 copy available at Holocaust Museum Houston

Author:

Altman, Stefi.

Title:

A haunting past, a hopeful life : Holocaust survivor finds peace by speaking for the dead / by Claudia Feldman, Houston Chronicle.

Publisher:

Houston, TX : Houston Chronicle, c2004.

Physical:

7 p ; 11 cm.

Notes:

No videotaped interview, no transcript. File contains original section of Houston Chronicle newspaper interview with photos and online reprint, text only.

Notes:

This survivor's story is featured in The Josef and Edith Mincberg Destroyed Communities Interactive Learning Center.

Summary:

Stefi Altman, a Holocaust survivor, was born in 1926[?] in Lublin, Poland. In 1939, her brothers were arrested by the Nazis, later dying in Majdanek. A local teacher and priest helped Stefi create a false identity and sent her to an agricultural school, where she was arrested. Stefi was sent to the Jastkov labor camp, where she made pillows. She escaped for several months and wandered, eventually finding work with a Polish farmer. She was abused by a neighbor, eventually returning to Jastkov out of necessity. From Jastkov Stefi was moved with others to Treblinka, where she sorted victims’ belongings. She witnessed the deaths of prisoners, prisoners being shaved, and guards stripping gold and silver from teeth. She was moved to Majdanek, then to Dorohucza. In 1943, she was reunited with her younger sister Kaiyla, who was later killed there. Stefi escaped Dorohucza during a camp disturbance. Stefi hid in a tunnel under a sympathetic farmer’s barn. In 1944, she was liberated by the Red Army. The Soviets fed the farmer’s family plus Stefi, later driving them to the Red Cross office in Lublin. In 1944, Stefi learned that none of her family had survived. She married her husband Hershel in Poland in 1946. They arrived in Houston in 1949.

Of note: The U.S. Department of Justice identified Stefi as the sole survivor of Dorohucza camp and used her testimony to prosecute camp guard Andrew Kuras, who had moved to the U.S. after the war.

NOTE: No oral history tape available at Holocaust Museum Houston.

Summary:

U.S. Department of Justice identified Stefi Altman as sole survivor of Dorohucza camp and used her testimony to prosecute camp guard, Andrew Kuras who had moved to the U.S. after the war. U.S. Magistrate revoked Kuras' U.S. citizenship. - Press release, Holocaust Museum Houston, May 24, 2004.

Summary:

Subject:

Majdanek (Concentration camp)--Personal narratives.

Subject:

Treblinka (Concentration camp)--Personal narratives.

Subject:

Jastkow (Concentration camp)--Personal narratives.

Subject:

Dorohucza (Concentration camp)--Personal narratives.

AE:PersName:

Feldman, Claudia (interviewer)

Call:

OH Transcripts, Altman File

Field Ind Subfield Data
001 Control No     7260
005 LastTransaction     20171204164117.0
100 ME:PersonalName   $a Personal name  Altman, Stefi.
245 Title $a Title  A haunting past, a hopeful life :
    $b Remainder of title  Holocaust survivor finds peace by speaking for the dead /
    $c Statement of responsibility  by Claudia Feldman, Houston Chronicle.
260 PublicationInfo   $a Place of publication, dist.  Houston, TX :
    $b Name of publisher, dist, etc  Houston Chronicle,
    $c Date of publication, dist, etc  c2004.
300 Physical Desc   $a Extent  7 p ;
    $c Dimensions  11 cm.
500 General Note   $a General note  No videotaped interview, no transcript. File contains original section of Houston Chronicle newspaper interview with photos and online reprint, text only.
500 General Note   $a General note  This survivor's story is featured in The Josef and Edith Mincberg Destroyed Communities Interactive Learning Center.
520 Summary   $a Summary, etc. note  Stefi Altman, a Holocaust survivor, was born in 1926[?] in Lublin, Poland. In 1939, her brothers were arrested by the Nazis, later dying in Majdanek. A local teacher and priest helped Stefi create a false identity and sent her to an agricultural school, where she was arrested. Stefi was sent to the Jastkov labor camp, where she made pillows. She escaped for several months and wandered, eventually finding work with a Polish farmer. She was abused by a neighbor, eventually returning to Jastkov out of necessity. From Jastkov Stefi was moved with others to Treblinka, where she sorted victims’ belongings. She witnessed the deaths of prisoners, prisoners being shaved, and guards stripping gold and silver from teeth. She was moved to Majdanek, then to Dorohucza. In 1943, she was reunited with her younger sister Kaiyla, who was later killed there. Stefi escaped Dorohucza during a camp disturbance. Stefi hid in a tunnel under a sympathetic farmer’s barn. In 1944, she was liberated by the Red Army. The Soviets fed the farmer’s family plus Stefi, later driving them to the Red Cross office in Lublin. In 1944, Stefi learned that none of her family had survived. She married her husband Hershel in Poland in 1946. They arrived in Houston in 1949.

Of note: The U.S. Department of Justice identified Stefi as the sole survivor of Dorohucza camp and used her testimony to prosecute camp guard Andrew Kuras, who had moved to the U.S. after the war.

NOTE: No oral history tape available at Holocaust Museum Houston.
520 Summary   $a Summary, etc. note  U.S. Department of Justice identified Stefi Altman as sole survivor of Dorohucza camp and used her testimony to prosecute camp guard, Andrew Kuras who had moved to the U.S. after the war. U.S. Magistrate revoked Kuras' U.S. citizenship. - Press release, Holocaust Museum Houston, May 24, 2004.
520 Summary   $a Summary, etc. note 
610 Subj:CorpName $a Corporate name  Majdanek (Concentration camp)
    $v Form subdivision  Personal narratives.
610 Subj:CorpName $a Corporate name  Treblinka (Concentration camp)
    $v Form subdivision  Personal narratives.
610 Subj:CorpName $a Corporate name  Jastkow (Concentration camp)
    $v Form subdivision  Personal narratives.
610 Subj:CorpName $a Corporate name  Dorohucza (Concentration camp)
    $v Form subdivision  Personal narratives.
700 AE:PersName   $a Personal name  Feldman, Claudia (interviewer)
852 Holdings   $a Location  HMH
    $p Barcode  11505
    $9 Cost  $0.00
    $h Classification part  OH Transcripts, Altman File

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